Bee abundance estimates vary by collection method and flowering richness

Monitoring bee populations is becoming increasingly important and commonplace, but do current methods produce reliable estimates of bee communities? Authors Marirose Kuhlman and Philip Hahn explore this question in their latest research. Wild bees are the main pollinators in nearly all terrestrial ecosystems and are essential to the reproductive cycles of many native plants, agricultural crops, and to the success of habitat restoration projects. Because … Continue reading Bee abundance estimates vary by collection method and flowering richness

What limits bumblebee populations on farmland?

A new study by Timberlake and colleagues finds that late summer nectar supply on farmland has an important influence on bumblebee colony density the following year – does this offer an opportunity to devise more targeted agri-environment schemes for pollinators? Pollen and nectar are the primary food source for most adult pollinators, and in the case of bees, their larvae too. It is no surprise … Continue reading What limits bumblebee populations on farmland?

ESE Editor’s Choice 1:1 – Understanding invasive plant phenology to better protect native island species

Laysan albatrosses amongst a field of golden crownbeard © David Dow Taylor et al.’s recent From Practice article details a case study on Midway Atoll that demonstrates the importance of understanding plant phenology to better control and eradicate non-native species. Lead Editor Carolyn Kurle highlights this article as the inaugural Ecological Solutions and Evidence Editor’s Choice. Invasive species on islands are an enormous problem; largely … Continue reading ESE Editor’s Choice 1:1 – Understanding invasive plant phenology to better protect native island species

Using phenology to guide invasive plant management

Successful restoration of degraded land often depends on well-timed interventions to control invasive species. In their recently published article, Taylor and colleagues present a case study of the effects of incorporating phenology information into invasive plant control operations at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), USA. The authors share their story below. Towards the end of April, millions of birds, including warblers, tanagers, buntings, grosbeaks … Continue reading Using phenology to guide invasive plant management