Research stories: Boxing for conservation

Authors Brian Burke and Darren O’Connell discuss the conservation of roseate terns at Europe’s largest colony on Rockabill Island in Dublin, Ireland, with their latest research highlighting the important role artificial nestboxes have played in the species’ population growth and recovery. The role of a tern warden on Rockabill Island has been described on more than one occasion as a dream job. A summer spent … Continue reading Research stories: Boxing for conservation

Editor’s Choice 59:7 The key to seabird conservation – mitigating bycatch from industrial fisheries and eradicating invasive species

Associate Editor, Maria Paniw, introduces this month’s Editor’s Choice article by Dasnon et al., which presents some good news for seabird conservation: combined efforts of avoiding bycatch from commercial fisheries and reducing impacts of invasive species can effectively boost population sizes of vulnerable marine pelagic species. Industrial fishing activities can cause substantial damage, not only to fish stocks but also to pelagic vertebrate predators that … Continue reading Editor’s Choice 59:7 The key to seabird conservation – mitigating bycatch from industrial fisheries and eradicating invasive species

A quantitative feasibility assessment for translocating highly mobile, endangered species

Using long-term data, IPMs, & expert judgement, Fischer et al. demonstrate how translocation feasibility can be assessed quantitatively and transparently for endangered, philopatric, and highly mobile species, such as Kuaka. Kuaka, or Whenua Hou Diving Petrels, are in dire straits. The population of this Critically Endangered seabird is estimated at ~200 adults. Kuaka occupy the smallest breeding area of any bird species in Aotearoa New … Continue reading A quantitative feasibility assessment for translocating highly mobile, endangered species

Linking research and action: protecting seabirds in the face of climate change

In their latest research, Henry Hakkinen and colleagues explore how existing knowledge can be brought together in a pressure-state-response framework that connects climate change ecology, conservation evidence assessments and management. The impacts of human activities on ecosystems and natural resources across the world are well known, and now extend to nearly every ecosystem on Earth. Given the scale and severity of human-driven impacts on the … Continue reading Linking research and action: protecting seabirds in the face of climate change

Calling all seabirds: restoring long-lost colonies on Desecheo Island

Lead author Jose Luis Herrera-Giraldo describes his team’s latest study using fake birds and loudspeakers to help conservationists restore the long-lost seabird colony of Desecheo Island, Puerto Rico. For scientists and conservationists, life on Desecheo National Wildlife Refuge in Puerto Rico is harsh with the islands’ rugged terrain, blazing hot sun beating down year-round, and fire ant. But for seabirds the island is paradise – … Continue reading Calling all seabirds: restoring long-lost colonies on Desecheo Island

Meet the Editor: Holly Jones

It has already been three months since we launched our new journal Ecological Solutions and Evidence and we are proud to say we have a strong, diverse and growing Editorial Board. We are currently recruiting another Lead Editor to join our Senior Editor team so there is no better time to get to know our current Lead Editor Holly Jones in this ‘Meet the Editor’ … Continue reading Meet the Editor: Holly Jones

Identifying hotspots of threats to marine megafauna

In newly published research, A framework for mapping the distribution of seabirds by integrating tracking, demography and phenology, Ana P. B. Carneiro et al. present a new framework aiming to tackle challenges of tracking seabird movement and ultimately improve bycatch mitigation measures. There is increased global awareness that our oceans are under threat. Marine megafauna such as seabirds, marine turtles, marine mammals, sharks and rays … Continue reading Identifying hotspots of threats to marine megafauna

Predator and scavenger movements as opportunities for pathogen spread among endangered seabirds

Infectious diseases have recently been acknowledged as an important threat for wild populations, notably seabirds. In order to implement efficient surveillance and management programmes, it is critical to look beyond the sick individuals to identify the individuals or species involved in cryptic epidemiological processes, such as pathogen spread. Amandine Gamble et al. summarise their recent research on the potential role of predators and scavengers in … Continue reading Predator and scavenger movements as opportunities for pathogen spread among endangered seabirds

Comportement alimentaire des prédateurs et charognards et opportunités pour la dissémination d’agents pathogènes

Les maladies infectieuses sont depuis peu reconnues comme une menace importante pour les populations sauvages, notamment les oiseaux marins. Afin de mettre en place des mesures de surveillance et de gestion efficaces, il est essentiel de regarder au-delà de l’animal malade pour pouvoir identifier les individus ou espèces impliqués dans les processus épidémiologiques cryptiques, tels que la dissémination d’agents pathogènes. Amandine Gamble et collaborateurs résument … Continue reading Comportement alimentaire des prédateurs et charognards et opportunités pour la dissémination d’agents pathogènes

Identifying fishery risk zones for seabird populations

Part of our Spotlight, Management of wide-ranging species, Thomas A. Clay explains how advances in remote tracking technology are offering us a glimpse into the mysterious life of the albatross in the hope of developing conservation measures to protect seabirds from bycatch risks. The authors have adapted this post from an article they previously shared with BirdLife International. Albatrosses are iconic voyagers, well known for … Continue reading Identifying fishery risk zones for seabird populations