BES journal blogs round up: February 2019

February was another busy month across the British Ecological Society blogs. We’ve seen the launch of Special Features on ecological succession and advances in modelling demographic processes, as well as a cross-journal series on rewilding, a look at the physics behind predator and prey size ratios and an exploration of how climate change is affecting penguin interactions. Read on for more highlights. Functional Ecologists – … Continue reading BES journal blogs round up: February 2019

Trophic rewilding: restoring top-down food web processes to promote self-managing ecosystems

Continuing our series on rewilding, Jens-Christian Svenning from the Center for Biodiversity Dynamics in a Changing World, Aarhus University, focuses in on trophic rewilding. Here he considers the foundations and open-ended nature of this approach, and explains why there is still plenty of room for more research in this area. There is rapidly increasing interest in rewilding as an alternative to more human-controlled approaches to … Continue reading Trophic rewilding: restoring top-down food web processes to promote self-managing ecosystems

Welcome to our new Associate Editors – 2019

Towards the end of last year and the start of this, we welcomed some new faces to our Editorial Board. Get to know our new Associate Editors: Amy J. Dickman Wild Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford Amy has more than 20 years’ experience working on large carnivores in Africa, specialising in human-carnivore conflict. She has an MSc from Oxford University and … Continue reading Welcome to our new Associate Editors – 2019

Shining a light on indirect interactions

Many of us are familiar with direct effects of light pollution but how do these effects cascade and have wider implications? Associate Editor, Owen Lewis discusses the recently published article by Bennie et al. Artificial light at night causes top‐down and bottom‐up trophic effects on invertebrate populations. You’ve probably seen the images of a night-time earth taken from space: the cities of Europe and North … Continue reading Shining a light on indirect interactions

Better many small than a few large: how landscape configuration affects arthropod communities in rice agroecosystems

Can splitting agricultural ecosystems help reduce yield losses for rice farmers? Associate Editor, Juan Corley highlights the importance of Dominik et al.’s recent research, Landscape composition, configuration, and trophic interactions shape arthropod communities in rice agroecosystems. A Spanish version of this post is available here. For many of us city dwellers, rice is common in much modern cuisine, from Sushi to Spanish paella. However more … Continue reading Better many small than a few large: how landscape configuration affects arthropod communities in rice agroecosystems

Mejor muchos pequeños que pocos grandes: sobre como la configuración del paisaje afecta las comunidades de artrópodos en agro-ecosistemas de arroz

Associate Editor, Juan Corley on Dominik et al.’s research, Landscape composition, configuration, and trophic interactions shape arthropod communities in rice agroecosystems. English version available here. Para muchos de nosotros habitantes de ciudades, el arroz están muy presente en nuestra cocina habitual, desde el Sushi hasta la Paella. No obstante, quizás sea de mayor significación es el hecho de que el arroz sea el cereal más … Continue reading Mejor muchos pequeños que pocos grandes: sobre como la configuración del paisaje afecta las comunidades de artrópodos en agro-ecosistemas de arroz