Forests undergoing novel disturbances: understanding and managing the complex new reality of forests

Considering the vast impacts disturbances such as fire and insect outbreaks are having on forests worldwide, Alexandro B. Leverkus and Simon Thorn bring together a selection of work showcasing quality research into these disturbances and strategies being taken to manage them.

This Virtual Issue features articles from across the British Ecological Society journals that are free-to-read for a limited time. Continue reading Forests undergoing novel disturbances: understanding and managing the complex new reality of forests

Black and white fragmentation maps can be misleading

Recent research from Marina Antongionanni and colleagues estimates 47,000 fragments of Caatinga dry forests to be affected by chronic human disturbances. Here the authors look at how such effects are depicted, and demonstrate how this knowledge can help define large-scale conservation and management actions. Continue reading Black and white fragmentation maps can be misleading

Why ecology matters

This week, the British Ecological Society are attending New Scientist Live to showcase Incredible Creatures and bring ecological research to a wider audience. Focused across four zones; jungle, water, nocturnal, and people and nature, we’re excited to share the value of ecology in tackling the biggest challenges faced by our natural world. To celebrate this, we’ve brought together Why Ecology Matters; a selection of articles … Continue reading Why ecology matters

Forest patches in working landscapes offer surprising opportunities to conserve neotropical birds

A Spanish version of this post is available here. After years of research into the biodiversity value of agricultural countrysides, it has become clear that, while there is great potential to conserve wildlife alongside humanity in ‘working landscapes’, wildlife communities remain distinct from those in nature reserves. But can working landscapes ever support vulnerable, reserve-affiliated species? New research from Costa Rica by Karp et al. … Continue reading Forest patches in working landscapes offer surprising opportunities to conserve neotropical birds

Parches boscosos en paisajes agrícolas: la estrategia para conservar las aves Neotropicales

An English version of this post is also available here. Tras investigar la biodiversidad en zonas agrícolas y ganaderas por varios años, se ha encontrado que las fincas, haciendas y jardines tienen mucho potencial para conservar la biodiversidad. Sin embargo, dichas áreas no son reemplazos de las áreas protegidas ya que hay algunas especies que solamente habitan en áreas protegidas. Un nuevo artículo de investigación … Continue reading Parches boscosos en paisajes agrícolas: la estrategia para conservar las aves Neotropicales

Deer prevent severe canopy fires, save oak trees and contribute to ecosystem carbon storage

While deer may impact tree regeneration, they can also help prevent the spread of severe wildfires. Given increased likelihood of extreme climatic events, such as droughts, Miguel Bugalho explains how we need to consider both the positive and negative effects of wild ungulate grazing.  Deer mitigate severe wildfires Wild ungulate herbivores, namely deer, may negatively affect tree regeneration through consumption and damage of young seedlings … Continue reading Deer prevent severe canopy fires, save oak trees and contribute to ecosystem carbon storage

A new way to reduce the introduction of exotic pests and diseases in trees into the UK

New research highlights the need for policies that encourage nurseries to produce home-grown plants and thus reduce the risk of importing tree pests and diseases that threaten the UK’s woodland. Author of Variability in commercial demand for tree saplings affects the probability of introducing exotic forest diseases, Vasthi Alonso Chavez and British Ecological Society Policy Manager, Brendan Costelloe explain more. A Spanish version of this … Continue reading A new way to reduce the introduction of exotic pests and diseases in trees into the UK

Nuevas estrategias para reducir la introducción de enfermedades forestales exóticas al Reino Unido

Vasthi Alonso Chavez and Brendan Costelloe on Variability in commercial demand for tree saplings affects the probability of introducing exotic forest diseases. English version available here. La industria viverista del Reino Unido genera ingresos económicos sustanciales a través del movimiento y comercialización de árboles a gran escala. Sin embargo, esta comercialización puede ser un vehículo para la introducción de plagas y enfermedades forestales. La importación de … Continue reading Nuevas estrategias para reducir la introducción de enfermedades forestales exóticas al Reino Unido

Integrating fire management policies within conservation planning: ‘win-win’ solutions for bird conservation and wildfire prevention

Adrián Regos and colleagues highlight how their conservation planning objectives can lead to ‘win-win’ situations for bird conservation and wildfire prevention in fire-prone abandoned landscapes. This follows the recent publication of their article, Trade‐offs and synergies between bird conservation and wildfire suppression in the face of global change. Protected areas play a key role in safeguarding biodiversity worldwide. However, their role can be seriously compromised … Continue reading Integrating fire management policies within conservation planning: ‘win-win’ solutions for bird conservation and wildfire prevention

Issue 55:3

From fisheries management, to reintroductions and land use policies, here are some highlights from issue 55:3: Addressing global fisheries management challenges in a changing world Our latest Spotlight, showcasing high-quality and topical research Targeted supplementary feeding supports reintroduction of endangered raptors This issue’s Editor’s Choice Is environmental legislation conserving tropical stream faunas? Looking beyond the trees in tropical forest landscapes Evaluating the temporal effectiveness of marine reserves Species recovery … Continue reading Issue 55:3